Fellows

Anne-Marie Logan

Reference Librarian

Darcy Lowell

Pediatrics, Child Study Center

James Lu

AYA, Board of Governors

Oscar Lubow

Tso-Ping Ma

Electrical Engineering (SEAS)

Ramsay MacMullen

Emeritus, History

Ramsay MacMullen, a New Yorker to begin with, then away for an education to a PhD (all told, nine years at Harvard); teaching at Oregon, then Brandeis, then Yale (1967-; retired 1993); Master of Calhoun College 1984-90. Enjoyed intramurals as a Fellow, then as a Master, for ca. 8 seasons, never scored but never scored ONE when on the ice. A naturally defensive personality. Books on early 19th c. US women’s history; books on philosophy, sort of; also on religious history in Antiquity; and on social history.

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Gregory Margulis

Math

Mary Beth Marshall

Marybeth Marshall

Minister

William Massa

Head of Collection Development, Manuscripts & Archives

Bill Massa’s primary prior work experience was at the Smithsonian Institution Archives in Washington, DC, from 1977 to 1988 when he moved to Yale.  He works in Manuscripts and Archives, Sterling Memorial Library, most recently as Head of Collection Development (working with donors to acquire manuscript collections based on our collecting criteria).  He also spends a fair amount of time with researchers, including undergraduates, who are in need of primary source materials for an academic assignment, a student publication, or a major writing project such as a dissertation or monograph. 

As a Trumbull College Fellow, he has been advising freshmen since the late 1990s. This has truly been the most fulfilling part of his life at Yale; he enjoys getting to know not only the advisees assigned to him, and through them, their friends.  He also serves as a Personal Librarian to about 35 Trumbull freshmen and sophomores each year.

His primary academic interest is Yale history, but he has gained a wide knowledge of primary sources at Yale and searching for related materials beyond Yale. 

Outside of Yale, he enjoys hiking, snowshoeing (bring on the snow and lots of it!), and collecting early (mid-18th to about the 1820s) American domestic lighting devices.

BA, Elizabethtown College; MA, University of Wisconsin, Madison

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Thomas Masse

Music

Thomas Masse is dean of the Stetson University School of Music and professor of music. A clarinetist, he has performed as concerto soloist, orchestral musician and chamber musician throughout the United States, Canada, South America, Europe and Asia, and has taught at the University of Michigan, the University of Northern Colorado and Yale University. As a university administrator, he is known as a passionate advocate for the role of the arts in education and society.

A graduate of Yale University, where he received the first artist diploma ever awarded a clarinetist, Masse earned his doctoral degree at the University of Michigan where he was a Regents Fellow. His primary teachers were David Shifrin and Fred Ormand. In addition, he holds an master of business administration degree from the University of Connecticut and a professional certificate in fundraising from New York University.

Prior to his appointment at Stetson University, Masse was the associate provost for the arts at Yale University where he had academic, financial and strategic responsibility for the schools of architecture, art, divinity, drama and music, as well as the Institute for Sacred Music and the Norfolk Chamber Music Festival/Yale Summer School of Art and Music. For nearly ten years, Masse served in a variety of decanal positions at the Yale School of Music culminating in his appointment as deputy dean from 2005 to 2009. He began his academic career at the University of Northern Colorado in 1995 and became the youngest tenured faculty member at the university.

Enrique Mayer Behrendt

AnthropologyBorn in the highlands of Peru to Jewish immigrant parents who had fled Nazi Germany, Enrique Mayer completed his college education at the London School of Economics and received his doctorate from Cornell University. His professional career as a university teacher began at the Pontificia Universidad Católica in Lima, Peru. He later moved to Mexico City, where he took charge of the Department of Anthropological Research at the Inter American Indian Institute. In 1982 he joined the faculty of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign with a joint appointment in the Department of Anthropology and the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies. In 1995, he became a member of the Anthropology Department at Yale University. Professor Mayer specializes in Andean agricultural systems and Latin American peasantries. His work has shown that regions characterized by diversity (such as mountainous environments, small islands, and “marginal” lands), not suitable for agribusiness, are exploited by peasants in strikingly similar ways. Worldwide, peasant forms of production predominate and persist in these environments. These agricultural systems are important to those concerned about world genetic resources, or about environmental conservation, and to scholars who seek an understanding of ancient and yet also very contemporary Non Western rural life-ways. He is currently collecting “ugly” stories about the agrarian reform in Peru (1969), finding that most people, although they benefited from it, nonetheless feel victimized and regard the reform as a failure. He is also the author of The Articulated Peasant: Household Economies in the Andes (2001). Email Enrique Mayer Behrendt

Gregory McCarthy

Our research program is concerned with the functional organization of the human brain. We seek to identify and characterize functional brain processes, and to determine how these processes are evident in psychological phenomena. We are also interested in how these functional brain processes and their anatomical substrates are altered in pathological states. A current and enduring theme of our research is social perception and cognition. We have been particularly interested in the manner in which information about the surface features of animate entities (such as faces and bodies) and information about motion trajectories contribute to inferences about the goals and intentions of social agents. With respect to the brain, these studies have focused on two regions: 1) ventral occipitotemporal cortex, an area generally associated with the perception of visual categories including faces and bodies, and 2) lateral occipitotemporal cortex, and area associated with biological motion. Another research theme is the neuroscience of executive processing and working memory. We are interested in the way that task-irrelevant stressors influence functional connectivity between the amygdala, inferior frontal gyrus, and ventromedial prefrontal cortex when subjects are engaged in demanding primary tasks such as working memory or maze finding. Our methods include neuroimaging (functional and structural MRI, and diffusion tensor imaging), EEG and ERP from scalp recordings in healthy volunteers, intracranial EEG recording and direct cortical stimulation in patients, eye tracking, and behavioral measures.Email Gregory McCarthy

Gregory McCarthy

Psychology

Patrick McCreless

Music Department

Patrick McCreless has a Master of Music in Music Theory from the University of Michigan, and the Ph. D. in Music Theory from the Eastman School of Music of the University of Rochester. Before coming to Yale in 1998, he taught for fifteen years at the University of Texas at Austin, where he was Associate Director of the School of Music, and five years before that at the Eastman School of Music.

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Jennifer McNiff

Dermatology

Dr. McNiff is a Professor of Dermatology and Pathology and directs the Yale Dermatopathology service, which receives skin biopsies for diagnosis from around the world. She went to Swarthmore College and then University of Vermont for medical school. When not working at her microscope, Dr. McNiff enjoys hiking, sailing, and relaxing at home with her family, including husband Mike, two children (high school students at Choate Rosemary Hall) and two rambunctious dogs.

Email Jennifer McNiff

James Meehan

Konstantinos Meghir

Economics

Konstantinos Meghir is the Douglas A Warner III Professor of Economics.  Professor Meghir’s research interests include Econometrics, Public policy, Labor economics, Economics of education, Microeconometrics, Evaluation of public policy, Household behavior, Retirement and pensions, Income distribution, Consumption, Demand analysis, Investment, Development economics.

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Jay Meizlish

School of Medicine

Mark Mitchell

Art GalleryMark D. Mitchell is the Holcombe T. Green Curator of American Paintings and Sculpture at the Yale University Art Gallery. He came to Yale in August 2015 from the Philadelphia Museum of Art, where he organized Audubon to Warhol: The Art of American Still Life and George Inness in Italy. He completed his doctorate at Princeton in 2002 and previously worked at the Princeton University Art Museum, Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth College, and National Academy Museum in New York. His research interests in American art extend from the colonial period to the later twentieth century in all media, with particular depth in landscape and still life painting.Email Mark Mitchell

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